The Art of Losing. Polish Poetry and Translation

Written in English by Clare Cavanagh

| A specimen of Babel: Stories on the loss of the earth’s one speech and the confusion of languages

Add

I’ve called my essay “The Art of Losing” for obvious reasons: according to many critics, losing things is what translators do best. And it seems to me—although this may just be my personal bias—that translators of poetry generally get the worst of it. “Why isn’t your translation faithful? Why isn’t it literal?” we’re asked—as if “faithful” and “literal” were synonyms, and as if one of poetry’s tasks weren’t to shake us loose from the fetters of literal-mindedness. “Why did you keep the form and mangle the meaning, or vice versa?” we’re queried—as if poetry weren’t forever inviting us to consider the forms of meaning and the meaning of forms. Translating poetry, we’re often reminded, is impossible. Well, apparently so is bees’ flying—but the bees who translate poetry have been busy for a long while now, so perhaps it’s time to reconsider this particular brand of impossibility. What people really mean when they say this, I suspect, is that it’s impossible to translate poetry perfectly. Fair enough. But what are the other activities that we human beings perform so flawlessly against which the translation of poetry is being measured and found wanting?

My title is meant to suggest a more humane vision of translation. It implies, I hope, that the losses and gains that make up the art of translation are intertwined, and further, that in the case of poetry, the translator’s “art of loss,” in John Felstiner’s phrase, may perhaps be akin to what Elizabeth Bishop calls the “art of losing,” in her glorious villanelle “One Art.” I want to examine not how translation violates lyric art so much as the kinship I see between the force that impels some people to write lyric poetry—the force that Osip Mandelstam calls “the craving for form creation”—and the drive that pushes others to translate it. And I’d also like to take a look at what is lost and found when you try to follow the poet’s form-creating impulse by re-creating, however imperfectly, the original poem’s rhyme and meter.

Bishop’s villanelle is a perfect starting point for what I have in mind not only because it’s one of the loveliest poems in the English language. It’s also been re-created—marvelously—in Polish by my sometime cotranslator Stanislaw Baranczak, who is perhaps the most gifted and prolific translator from English in the history of Polish literature. And Bishop’s poem served, in turn, to create a new form in Polish poetry. It inspired Baranczak’s own villanelle “Plakala w nocy,” from his most recent collection, Chirurgiczna precyzja (Surgical Precision, 1998), which we have since translated into English as “She Cried That Night.” I’ll turn to that poem in a moment. But first, Bishop’s villanelle: 

One Art

The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster. 

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master. 

Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant to travel.
None of these will bring disaster. 

I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last,
or next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master. 

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster. 

—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
the art of losing’s not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster. 

Modern poetry, Jean-Paul Sartre remarks, “is the case of the loser winning.” And the tug-of-war between mastery and loss that structures Bishop’s poem would seem to lend weight to Sartre’s paradox. But let me turn here to another poem, whose title appears to contradict my argument. I have in mind one of Wislawa Szymborska’s best-known lyrics, “The Joy of Writing” (“Radosc pisania”). The kind of creation Szymborska celebrates might initially seem directly opposed to the “one art” that shapes Bishop’s poem. Szymborska’s joy of writing, though, derives by necessity from the limitations that circumscribe and define all human existence: this joy, she writes, is “the revenge of a mortal hand” (my italics). “The twinkling of an eye,” she exults, “will take as long as I say, / and will, if I wish, divide into tiny eternities, / full of bullets stopped in mid-flight.” But “what’s here isn’t life,” she reminds us: the poet’s temporary revenge makes sense only against the backdrop of a world in which bullets can’t be halted by rhymes and poetry’s “tiny eternities” are quickly gobbled up by greedy time. Szymborska’s ephemeral triumphs are tied to defeat in the same way that Bishop’s shaky efforts to master loss are trailed by their inescapable rhyme word, “disaster.” 

If poetry itself can effect only momentary “stays against confusion,” then what can possibly be gained by its parasitical in-law, translation? Let’s turn here briefly to Baranczak’s version of Bishop’s “One Art,” and take a look at what’s been lost and found in translation. First things first: Baranczak keeps the form, and he keeps it beautifully. He even manages, miraculously enough, to retain some of Bishop’s key enjambments. Polish doesn’t permit him to imitate the eloquent series of rhymes and half-rhymes that Bishop builds around “master” and “disaster”: “fluster,” “faster,” “last, or,” “vaster,” “gesture.” He compensates, though, with a sequence of movingly imperfect rhymes in the stanzas’ second lines: “przeczucie,” “klucze,” “uciec,” “uklucie,” “nie wroce,” “w sztuce.” Even a rough translation of these phrases is enough to show how closely he sticks to the original poem’s sense: “foreboding,” “keys,” “to flee,” “pang,” “won’t return,” “in art.” He can’t salvage the seemingly crucial rhyme of “master / disaster” in his Polish text—and it’s a loss, but it isn’t a disaster. And this is largely because he manages to retain the exquisite villanelle form of the original lyric. The poem’s structuring patterns of continuity and slippage, repetition and change, form a perfect analogue to its concern with what is lost through time and what may be retained. Without these, the poem would indeed be lost in translation. 

Let me turn now to what Baranczak makes of this form within his own work. Two of Chirurgiczna precyzja’s most moving lyrics are villanelles, and the poems not only share the form of “One Art”; they also mirror its concern with mastery and loss, with time’s inevitable depredations as partly countered by art. In “She Cried That Night” particularly, Baranczak draws upon Bishop’s psychologizing of the villanelle form, as repetition, recognition, and resistance intertwine to dramatize the psyche’s efforts to both evade and accept knowledge almost past bearing. (She turns another inherited form to similar ends in her glorious “Sestina.”) The poetic form is crucial to the forms of knowing and loss that the poem enacts, which is why we worked to retain it, at a cost, in our English version. 

SHE CRIED THAT NIGHT, BUT NOT FOR HIM TO HEAR

To Ania, the only one 

She cried that night, but not for him to hear.
In fact her crying wasn’t why he woke.
It was some other sound; that much was clear. 

And this half-waking shame. No trace of tears
all day, and still at night she works to choke
the sobs; she cries, but not for him to hear. 

And all those other nights: she lay so near,
but he had only caught the breeze’s joke,
the branch that tapped the roof. That much was clear. 

The outside dark revolved in its own sphere:
no wind, no window pane, no creaking oak
had said: “She’s crying, not for you to hear.” 

Untouchable are those tangibly dear,
so close, they’re closed, too far to reach and stroke
a quaking shoulder-blade. This much is clear. 

And he did not reach out—for shame, for fear
of spoiling the tears’ tenderness that spoke:
“Go back to sleep. What woke you isn’t here.
It was the wind outside, indifferent, clear.” 

—tr. Stanislaw Baranczak and Clare Cavanagh

There is no equivalent to the villanelle in the Polish tradition; in fact, Baranczak’s use of the form was seen by Polish critics as his personal contribution to Polish versification. The poetics of loss thus produce a clear gain for Polish poetry as well as giving a suggestive example of ways the translator’s art, or at least this particular translator’s art, both resembles and nourishes the lyric impulse.

In Wordsworth’s Prelude, Stephen Gill remarks, “all loss is converted into gain.” My hunch is that this holds true not just for The Prelude but for much of modern poetry generally (and perhaps even at times for translation). Certainly the Polish tradition confirms Gill’s comment with a vengeance. Since the time of the great Romantics—Adam Mickiewicz, Juliusz Slowacki, Zygmunt Krasinski—Polish poets have apparently wielded precisely the power that Shelley covets in his famous “Defense of Poetry.” After Poland vanished from the map of Europe following the partitions of the late eighteenth century, these writers became their battered nation’s acknowledged legislators. But if modern Polish history is any example, the losses that foster acknowledged bards and prophets may not offset the gains. Poets took the place of the state when Prussia, Austria, and Russia divided Poland among them, erasing it from the map of Europe for over a century. Poets fought and died in the Home Army that opposed the Nazi invaders during World War II. And poets served as the moral “second government,” in Solzhenitsyn’s phrase, that countered the illegitimate regime imported from Soviet Russia following the war. They enjoyed a prestige and popularity that their Western counterparts could only dream of. 

Not surprisingly, modern Polish poetry has produced a spectacular series of poems demonstrating the possibilities of creation from loss, as poets struggled to infuse a bleak postwar reality with what Mandelstam calls “teleological warmth” by creating lyric forms to take the place of the domestic shapes and human habitations shattered by one atrocity or another. Two of the poems I’ll quote here come from Czeslaw Milosz’s translations in his anthology Postwar Polish Poetry. The first is Leopold Staff’s “Foundations”: 

I built on the sand
And it tumbled down
I built on a rock
And it tumbled down.
Now when I build, I shall begin
With the smoke from the chimney. 

The next is Miron Bialoszewski’s “And Even, Even if They Take Away the Stove,” which he subtitles “My Inexhaustible Ode to Joy”:

I have a stove
similar to a triumphal arch! 

They take away my stove
similar to a triumphal arch!! 

Give me back my stove
similar to a triumphal arch!!! 

They took it away
What remains is
a grey
              naked
                            hole. 

And this is enough for me;
grey naked hole
grey naked hole.
greynakedhole. 

Finally, I want to quote a stanza from Milosz’s exquisite “Song on Porcelain,” in the splendid translation that Milosz himself produced in collaboration with Robert Pinsky: 

Rose-colored cup and saucer,
Flowery demitasses:
You lie beside the river
Where an armored column passes.
Winds from across the meadow
Sprinkle the banks with down;
A torn apple tree’s shadow
Falls on the muddy path;
The ground everywhere is strewn
With bits of brittle froth—
Of all things broken and lost
Porcelain troubles me most. 

The “small sad cry / Of cups and saucers cracking,” Milosz tells us in the English variant, bespeaks the end of their “masters’ precious dream / Of roses, of mowers raking, / And shepherds on the lawn.” Milosz violates his own translatorly preference for preserving sense at the expense of form here. This poem about the fragility of both human-made forms and the human form itself retains its pathos in English precisely because Milosz and Pinsky have managed to reproduce so movingly the stanzas and rhymes of the original. (I first heard the Polish original sung in a student cabaret in Krakow in 1981, and the melody I heard fits the English version as neatly as it did the Polish original, a tribute to the translators’ gifts.) 

Broken teacups and shattered pastorals: this would seem to be the landscape occupied by the lyric generally, according to many recent theorists. I have in mind critics from every point on the theoretical spectrum, from enemies of the lyric to its defenders, from Adorno, Bakhtin, and de Man to Sharon Cameron or Jerome McGann. The lyric, as the ideological critics in particular would have it, plays host to a panoply of enticing pipe dreams conjured up by benighted idealists whose visions are doomed in advance to frustration as reality fails, time and again, to ratify their various Xanadus and Byzantiums. Terry Eagleton, to give one particularly egregious example, sees it as a chief culprit in art’s alleged “refusal of life actually conducted in actual society,” which amounts to “complicity with class-interested strategies of smoothing over historical conflict and contradictions with claims of natural and innate organization.”

But it’s not simply the ideologists who see the lyric as aiming toward a sort of aesthetic isolationism. As Sharon Cameron puts it in Lyric Time, the poet strives to evade “the hesitations and ambiguities of a difficult reality” in his quest for “radical sameness” and the “transcendence of mortal vision.” He thus becomes the literary equivalent of Sisyphus, as his inevitable failure to attain a definitive reprieve from the limits of mortality plunges him time and again into a kind of lyric inferno, in which he is subjected to every imaginable form of “failure,” “pain,” “despair,” “exhaustion,” “grief,” and “terror.”

What do we make in this context of Bialoszewski’s little poem on his vanished stove, with its puzzling subtitle: “My Inexhaustible Ode to Joy”? We could, of course, read this as simple, even simple-minded irony. But I think we would be wrong. The world may well offer only, as Cameron writes, “a landscape of lost things.” But Bialoszewski demonstrates that each loss also offers a new way of seeing and something new to see, even if what comes into view is only a “grey naked hole.” He manages to generate a new form from absence and emptiness as the “greynakedhole” takes on a life of its own. Seen this way, the world’s inescapable losses generate not only pain but also creative possibility, and even perhaps “inexhaustible joy.” (The poem’s final lines in the original Polish read as follows: “szara naga jama / szara naga jama / sza-ra-na-ga-ja-ma / szaranagajama.” They thus provide an exuberantly Bialoszewskian twist on the art of losing, as the writers Dariusz Sosnicki and Piotr Sommer have suggested to me: this is the closest a Polish poet can come to speaking Japanese.)

I’ve mentioned the rich Polish tradition of poetic creation from loss. But Bialoszewski’s lyric with its unexpected subtitle suggests a different direction taken by some of postwar Poland’s greatest poets. This is what I will call the tradition of “joyful failure,” in which the poet is plagued not so much by the world’s emptiness as by its unplumbable abundance. “You can’t have everything. Where would you put it?” the comedian Steven Wright asks. Certainly not in a single poem, or even in a single human life. This is the dilemma shared by poets like Czeslaw Milosz, Adam Zagajewski, and Wislawa Szymborska, whose lyrics are linked by their endlessly resourceful, invariably thwarted efforts to achieve at last what Milosz calls the “unattainable” or, in Polish, “unembraced” or “unembraceable earth” (nieobjeta ziemia). 

“There was too much / of Lvov, it brimmed the container / it burst glasses, overflowed / each pond, lake, smoked through every / chimney,” Zagajewski writes in “To Go to Lvov” (“Jechac do Lwowa”), a poem that is at once both a stirring elegy to a vanished world and a paean to its inextinguishable presence: “[Lvov] is everywhere,” the poem ends. No merely human vessel can hope to contain once and for all a world that precedes us, exceeds us, and will finally outlast us: Lvov “burst glasses . . . smoked through every chimney.” (I’m quoting here from Renata Gorczynska’s splendid English version of the poem.) The lyric form, with its built-in limitations, can’t pretend to comprehensiveness in the way a novel or an epic poem might. It can serve, though, as a perfect embodiment or enactment of the individual’s ceaselessly renewed, joyous struggle to come to terms with a world that always lies slightly beyond his or her reach. 

Here I want to turn to two poems, or rather two translations, in which I attempted to keep up with two poets working to keep up with the world itself. The first is Szymborska’s “Birthday” (“Urodziny”): 

So much world all at once—how it rustles and bustles!
Moraines and morays and morasses and mussels,
the flame, the flamingo, the flounder, the feather—
how to line them all up, how to put them together?
All the thickets and crickets and creepers and creeks!
The beeches and leeches alone could take weeks.
Chinchillas, gorillas, and sarsaparillas—
thanks so much, but this excess of kindness could kill us.

Where’s the jar for this burgeoning burdock, brooks’ babble,
rooks’ squabble, snakes’ squiggle, abundance, and trouble?
How to plug up the gold mines and pin down the fox,
how to cope with the lynx, bobolinks, streptococs!
Take dioxide: a lightweight, but mighty in deeds;
what about octopodes, what about centipedes?
I could look into prices, but don’t have the nerve:
these are products I just can’t afford, don’t deserve.
Isn’t sunset a little too much for two eyes
that, who knows, may not open to see the sun rise?

I am just passing through, it’s a five-minute stop.
I won’t catch what is distant; what’s too close, I’ll mix up.
While trying to plumb what the void’s inner sense is,
I’m bound to pass by all these poppies and pansies.
What a loss when you think how much effort was spent
perfecting this petal, this pistil, this scent
for the one-time appearance that is all they’re allowed,
so aloofly precise and so fragilely proud. 

—tr. Stanislaw Baranczak and Clare Cavanagh 

In the poem, Szymborska sends language scrambling, by way of her frantic wordplay, rhythm, and rhymes, to keep pace with the relentless form-creation that animates nature itself. (She also provides, if we needed one, a perfect defense against the myth that literalness equals fidelity when translating poetry. What ham-handed translator would render the poem’s fifth and sixth lines as follows: “These thickets and muzzles and breams and rains, / geraniums and praying mantises, where will I put them?” The Polish text is clearly calling out for translators doing their damnedest to channel Gilbert and Sullivan, or maybe Ogden Nash: “All the thickets and crickets and creepers and creeks! / The beeches and leeches alone could take weeks.”)

The second poem I want to quote is Adam Zagajewski’s beautiful “Mysticism for Beginners” (“Mistyka dia poczatkujacych”): 

The day was mild, the light was generous.
The German on the cafe terrace
held a small book on his lap.
I caught sight of the title:
Mysticism for Beginners.
Suddenly I understood that the swallows
patrolling the streets of Montepulciano
with their shrill whistles,
and the hushed talk of timid travelers
from Eastern, so-called Central Europe,
and the white herons standing—yesterday? the day before?—
like nuns in fields of rice,
and the dusk, slow and systematic,
erasing the outlines of medieval houses,
and olive trees on little hills,
abandoned to the wind and heat,
and the head of the Unknown Princess
that I saw and admired in the Louvre,
and stained-glass windows like butterfly wings
sprinkled with pollen,
and the little nightingale practicing
its speech beside the highway,
and any journey, any kind of trip,
are only mysticism for beginners,
the elementary course, prelude
to a test that’s been
postponed. 

—tr. Clare Cavanagh 

It is another demonstration of the capacity to create lyric joy through apparent failure as Zagajewski, in a characteristic syntactic tour de force, breathlessly stretches one sentence out for the space of twenty-odd lines, only to conclude with the anticlimactic postponed examination that takes the place of the revelation—“suddenly I understood”—we’ve been waiting for. 

In my own conclusion, I want to turn to a distinctly nonpoetic analogy for what I see as perhaps the chief affinity between the poet’s joyful frustration and that of the translator. A few years back, when my son was first learning to walk, he started playing a game that scared the hell out of us. He would take a blanket, put it over his head, run down the hallway, bang into the walls at full speed, and fall down on the floor laughing his head off. “Oh my God,” we thought, “he’s going to be a quarterback.” 

But then I happened to be talking to a friend who’s a child psychologist, and I told her about Marty’s game. “It’s a philosophical experiment,” she said. “He wants to find out if the world still exists even when he can’t see it, and he laughs when he hits the wall because it’s still there.” 

– – –

The myth of Babel tells of the loss of the earth’s one language and one speech, and the confusion of languages. Suddenly every object and every idea assumed a plurality of names, and the oversized tower, symbol of human imagination and hubris, was abandoned within the shadow foreboding its destruction. With an unprecedented series of correlated texts, Specimen explores these magnificent ruins, hearing echoes of the multiplicity of languages and the birth of translation. This collection includes texts about Babel, translation or language, and special translations. In September 2021, 20 years after 9/11, the Babel festival will focus on the multiplication of languages and the present diaspora from the regions of ancient Babylon – the scattering of the children of men over the face of all the earth. >> www.babelfestival.com

© Clare Cavanagh

Sztuka tracenia. Poezja polska i przekład

Written in English by Clare Cavanagh

| A specimen of Babel: Stories on the loss of the earth’s one speech and the confusion of languages


Translated into Polish by Magda Heydel

Zatytułowałam swoje wystąpienie Sztuka tracenia z przyczyn oczywistych: według licznych krytyków właśnie tracenie wychodzi nam, tłumaczom, najlepiej. A mam wrażenie — choć to być może tylko moje prywatne odczucie — że tłumaczy poezji ocenia się zwykle najsurowiej. Dlaczego ten przekład nie jest wierny, dlaczego nie jest dosłowny — pytają nas ludzie, zupełnie jakby określenia „wierny” i „dosłowny” były synonimiczne i jakby do zadań poezji nie należało właśnie wyzwalanie nas z kajdan przyziemnej dosłowności. Dlaczego zachowujesz formę, a zniekształcasz znaczenie, albo vice versa—przesłuchują nas, zupełnie jakby poezja nie stanowiła wiecznego zaproszenia do rozważania form znaczenia i znaczeń formy. Przekładanie poezji jest—przypomina się nam często — niemożliwe. Cóż, zdaje się, że niemożliwy jest także pszczeli lot — a pszczoły przekładające poezję trudnią się tym zajęciem od bardzo dawna, więc może przyszła już pora na przemyślenie owego szczególnego rodzaju niemożliwości. Podejrzewam, że mówiąc o niemożliwości, ludzie mają na ogół na myśli niemożliwość doskonałego przełożenia poezji. Tu zgoda. Gdzież jednak są te inne, bezbłędnie realizowane dziedziny naszej ludzkiej twórczości, na tle których przekład poezji przedstawiałby się jako szczególnie niedoskonały?

Tytuł mojego wykładu kieruje nas ku bardziej ludzkiej wizji przekładu. Zawarta jest w nim czytelna, mam nadzieję, sugestia, że straty i zyski składające się na sztukę przekładu są ze sobą wzajemnie powiązane oraz że w przypadku tłumaczenia poezji „sztuka utraty”, by posłużyć się określeniem Johna Felstinera, ma pewien związek z tym, co Elizabeth Bishop w swojej cudownej vilanelli One Art (Ta jedna sztuka) nazywa „sztuką tracenia”. Nie chcę dziś mówić o tym, w jaki sposób przekład dokonuje gwałtu na liryce, ale o pokrewieństwach, jakie dostrzegam pomiędzy skłaniającą niektórych ludzi do pisania poezji lirycznej siłą, którą Osip Mandelsztam nazywa „dążeniem do tworzenia form”, a tą silą, która innych popycha do jej tłumaczenia.

Villanella Elizabeth Bishop stanowi doskonały punkt wyjścia moich rozważań nie tylko dlatego, że jest to jeden z najpiękniejszych wierszy napisanych po angielsku. Wiersz ten został również w cudowny sposób odtworzony w języku polskim przez mojego niegdysiejszego współpracownika, Stanisława Barańczaka — przypuszczalnie najbardziej utalentowanego i płodnego tłumacza literatury języka angielskiego w całej historii polskiego piśmiennictwa. Wiersz Bishop posłużył z kolei do stworzenia nowej formy w poezji polskiej. Stal się bowiem inspiracją dla własnej villanelli Barańczaka zatytułowanej Płakała w nocy, pochodzącej z jego ostatniego tomiku Chirurgiczna precyzja (1998). Przełożyliśmy ją wspólnie na angielski pod tytułem She Cried at Night i do tego wiersza wrócę za chwilę. Najpierw jednak villanella Elizabeth Bishop:

One Art

The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their boss is no disaster.

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.

I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last,
or next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.

—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
the art of losing’s not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

*

Ta jedna sztuka

W sztuce tracenia nie jest trudno dojść do wprawy;
tak wiele rzeczy budzi w nas zaraz przeczucie
straty, że kiedy się je traci — nie ma sprawy.

Trać co dzień coś nowego. Przyjmuj bez obawy
straconą szansę, upływ chwil, zgubione klucze.
W sztuce tracenia nie jest trudno dojść do wprawy.

Trać rozleglej, trać szybciej, ćwicz   — wejdzie ci w nawyk
utrata miejsc, nazw, schronień, dokąd chciałeś uciec
lub chociażby się wybrać. Praktykuj te sprawy.

Przepadł mi gdzieś zegarek po matce. Jaskrawy
blask dawnych domów? Dzisiaj — blady cień, uklucie
w sercu. W sztuce tracenia łatwo dojść do wprawy.

Straciłam dwa najdroższe miasta —ba, dzierżawy
ogromniejsze: dwie rzeki, kontynent.
Nie wrócę do nich już nigdy, ale trudno. Nie ma sprawy.

Nawet gdy stracę ciebie (ten gest, śmiech chropawy,
który kocham), nie będzie w tym kłamstwa. Tak, w sztuce
tracenia nie jest wcale trudno dojść do wprawy;
tak, straty to nie takie znów (Pisz!) straszne sprawy.

Poezja współczesna, powiada Jean-Paul Sartre, to „sytuacja, w której przegrany wygrywa”. A owo kształtujące strukturę wiersza Bishop przeciąganie liny między mistrzostwem i utratą przydaje chyba wagi paradoksowi Sartre’a. Chciałabym jednak zająć się przez chwilę innym wierszem, którego tytuł, jak można by sądzić, przeczy moim tezom. Mam na myśli jeden z najbardziej znanych wierszy Wisławy Szymborskiej, Radość pisania. Opiewany przez Szymborską rodzaj twórczości może w pierwszej chwili wydawać się całkowicie przeciwny niż owa „jedna sztuka” nadająca kształt wierszowi Bishop. Jednak radość pisania Szymborskiej z konieczności wynika z ograniczeń określających i definiujących całość ludzkiej egzystencji: radość ta, pisze Szymborska, to „zemsta ręki ś m i e r t e l n e j” (podkr. tłum.). „Okamgnienie — raduje się poetka — trwać będzie tak długo, jak zechcę, / pozwoli się podzielić na male wieczności / pełne wstrzymanych w locie kul”. Ale „tu nie jest życie”, przypomina nam: chwilowa zemsta poety ma sens jedynie na tle takiego świata, w którym kul nie da się zatrzymać za pomocą rymów, a żarłoczny czas szybko połyka „male wieczności” poezji. Ulotne tryumfy Szymborskiej są skazane na porażkę, tak samo jak pełne drżenia wysiłki Bishop, by dojść do wprawy (to master) w traceniu, za którymi podąża nieunikniony katastroficzny rym „straszne sprawy” (disaster).

Jeśli sama poezja jest w stanie tylko na chwilę „przeciwstawić się naporowi chaosu”, to czego można się spodziewać po jej pasożytnicznym powinowatym, przekładzie? Spójrzmy na Barańczakowską wersję Tej jednej sztuki pod kątem tracenia i zyskiwania w przekładzie. Zaczynając od początku: Barańczak zachowuje formę, i to zachowuje ją pięknie, udaje mu się nawet, cudem niemal, ocalić niektóre spośród najistotniejszych przerzutni wiersza Bishop. Język polski nie pozwala mu odtworzyć serii potoczystych rymów i współbrzmień w oryginale opartych na parze słów master i disaster (czyli: „doskonale opanować” oraz ,katastrofa”, co Barańczak oddaje jako ,nie ma sprawy” i „straszne sprawy” — przyp. tłum.), a mianowicie: fluster, faster, last, or, raster, gesture. Zostaje to skompensowane za pomocą ciągu wzruszająco niedokładnych rymów łączących drugie wersy kolejnych strof: ,przeczucie”, „klucze”, „uciec”, „ukłucie”, „nie wrócę”, „w sztuce”. Nawet pobieżna retranslacja tych słów na angielski ujawnia, jak bliskie są one oryginalnym sensom wiersza. Nie udaje się Barańczakowi ocalić w wersji polskiej najważniejszego rymu wiersza master / disaster, i jest to strata, ale nie katastrofa, a to w dużej mierze dlatego, że zachowany zostaje cudowny oryginalny kształt villanelli. Nadające wierszowi strukturę przeplatające się wzory ciągłości i rozpadu, powtórzenia i zmiany, tworzą doskonałą analogię do zawartego w niej rozmyślania nad tym, co wraz z upływem czasu tracimy, a co możemy zachować. Bez tych wzorów wiersz rzeczywiście zostałby w przekładzie utracony.

Spójrzmy teraz, jak Barańczak wykorzystuje tę formę we własnej twórczości. Dwa spośród najbardziej poruszających wierszy tomu Chirurgiczna precyzja to villanelle, które z Tą jedną sztuką Elizabeth Bishop dzielą nie tylko formę: znajdują w nich odbicie także jej przemyślenia nad zyskiwaniem wprawy i utratą, nad częściowym choćby sprzeciwem sztuki wobec grabieży, jakich dokonuje czas. Szczególnie w wierszu Płakała w nocy Barańczak zbliża się do charakterystycznego dla Bishop psychologizowania formy villanelli, gdzie powtórzenia, rozpoznania i przeciwstawienia splatają się z sobą, by ujawnić dramat psychiki dążącej do równoczesnej akceptacji i ucieczki od wiedzy przekraczającej siły poznającego. (Bishop w podobny sposób przekształca też inną odziedziczoną formę w swojej słynnej Sestynie). Forma poetycka ma zasadnicze znaczenie dla formy wiedzy i utraty wcielanej przez ten wiersz, dlatego też chcieliśmy ją, nawet za pewną cenę, zachować w wersji angielskiej:

Płakała w nocy, ale nie jej płacz go zbudził 

Ani, jedynej

Płakała w nocy, ale nie jej płacz go zbudził.
Nie był płaczem dla niego, chociaż mógł być o nim.
To był wiatr, dygot szyby, obce sprawom ludzi.

I półprzytomny wstyd: że ona tak się trudzi,
to, co tłumione, czyniąc podwójnie tłumionym
przez to, że w nocy płacze. Nie jej płacz go zbudził:

ile więc było wcześniej nocy, gdy nie zwrócił ,
uwagi gdy skrzyp drewna, trzepiąca o komin
gałąź wiatr, dygot szyby związek z prawdą ludzi

negowały staranniej: ich szmer gasł, nim wrzucił
do skrzynki bezsenności rzeczowy anonim:
„Płakała w nocy, chociaż nie jej płacz cię zbudził”?

na wyciągnięcie ręki — ci dotkliwie drudzy,
niedotykalnie drodzy ze swoim „śpij, pomiń
snem tę wilgoć poduszki, nocne prawo ludzi”.

I nie wyciągnął ręki. Zakłóciłby, zbrudził
toporniejszą tkliwością jej tkliwość. „Zapomnij.
Płakałam w nocy, ale nie mój płacz cię zbudził.
To był wiatr, dygot szyby, obce sprawom ludzi”

*

She Cried That Night, But Not for Him to Hear 

To Ania, the only one 

She cried that night, but not for him to hear.
In fact her crying wasn’t why he woke.
It was some other sound; that much was clear. 

And this half-waking shame. No trace of tears
all day, and still at night she works to choke
the sobs; she cries, but not for him to hear. 

And all those other nights: she lay so near,
but he had only caught the breeze’s joke,
the branch that tapped the roof. That much was clear. 

The outside dark revolved in its own sphere:
no wind, no window pane, no creaking oak
had said: “She’s crying, not for you to hear.” 

Untouchable are those tangibly dear,
so close, they’re closed, too far to reach and stroke
a quaking shoulder-blade. This much is clear. 

And he did not reach out—for shame, for fear
of spoiling the tears’ tenderness that spoke:
“Go back to sleep. What woke you isn’t here.
It was the wind outside, indifferent, clear.” 

— tłum. St. Barańczak i C. Cavanagh

W polskiej tradycji poetyckiej nie ma odpowiednika dla villanelli. Niektórzy krytycy przypisują wręcz Barańczakowi stworzenie tej formy na gruncie polskim i uznają ją za osobisty wkład poety w polską wersyfikację. Poetyka utraty okazuje się zatem oczywistym zyskiem dla poezji polskiej, a równocześnie dostarcza sugestywnego przykładu na to, jak twórczość tłumacza, a przynajmniej twórczość tego konkretnego tłumacza, przypomina i tym samym wspomaga jego impuls liryczny.

Jak zauważa Stephen Gill, w Preludium Wordswortha „wszelka strata zamieniona zostaje w zysk”. Mam przeczucie, że jest to prawda nie tylko w odniesieniu do Preludium, ale również do większości poezji współczesnej (a pewnie czasem także do przekładu). Polska tradycja z pewnością gorliwie potwierdza tezę Gilla. Od czasu wielkich romantyków — Mickiewicza, Słowackiego, Krasińskiego — poeci polscy z pewnością władali tą właśnie siłą, o której posiadanie w swojej słynnej Obronie poezji tak bardzo zabiega Shelley. Kiedy w wyniku przeprowadzonych w końcu XVIII wieku rozbiorów Polska zniknęła z mapy Europy, ci właśnie pisarze stali się niepisanymi przywódcami umęczonego narodu. Jeśli jednak współczesna historia Polski ma służyć za przykład, to straty, którymi żywią się wielcy bardowie i prorocy, mogą się okazać niewspółmierne wobec zysków. Poeci wzięli na siebie rolę państwa, kiedy Prusy, Austria i Rosja podzieliły Polskę, wymazując ją na ponad stulecie z mapy Europy. W czasie II wojny światowej poeci walczyli w Armii Krajowej przeciwko nazistom. Poeci pełnili funkcję „drugiego rządu”, by użyć określenia Sołżenicyna, przeciwstawiającego się bezprawnemu reżymowi importowanemu po II wojnie światowej z Rosji Sowieckiej. Cieszyli się prestiżem i popularnością, o jakiej ich zachodni koledzy mogli tylko marzyć.

Nic więc dziwnego, że współczesna poezja polska wytworzyła imponujący zbiór wierszy prezentujących możliwości tworzenia z materii utraty, poeci walczyli bowiem o to, by ponurą powojenną rzeczywistość nasycić „teleologicznym ciepłem”, by posłużyć się określeniem Mandelsztama, poprzez stwarzanie form lirycznych zastępujących domowe kształty i ludzkie siedziby, obrócone wniwecz przez którąś z kolejnych okropności wojny. Dwa z tych wierszy, które tu przytoczę, pochodzą z antologii Czesława Miłosza Postwar Polish Poetry. Pierwszy to wiersz Leopolda Staffa:

Podwaliny

Budowałem na piasku
I zwaliło się. Budowałem na skale
I zwaliło się.
Teraz budując zacznę
Od dymu z komina.

*

Foundations

I built on the sand
And it tumbled down
I built on a rock
And it tumbled down.
Now when I build, I shall begin
With the smoke from the chimney. 

Drugi wiersz to „Ach, gdyby; gdyby nawet piec zabrali…”, z podtytułem Moja niewyczerpana oda do radości

„Ach, gdyby, gdyby nawet piec zabrali…”
Moja niewyczerpana oda do radości

Mam piec
podobny do bramy triumfalnej!

Zabierają mi piec
podobny do bramy triumfalnej!!

Wdajcie mi piec
podobny do bramy triumfalnej!!!

Zabrali
Została po nim tylko
szara
            naga
                       jama

szara naga jama,
I to mi wystarczy:
szara naga jama
szara naga jama
sza-ra-na-ga-ja-ma.
szaranagajama.

*

And Even, Even If They Take Away the Stove
My Inexhaustable Ode to Joy

I have a stove
similar to a triumphal arch! 

They take away my stove
similar to a triumphal arch!! 

Give me back my stove
similar to a triumphal arch!!! 

They took it away
What remains is
a grey
              naked
                            hole. 

And this is enough for me;
grey naked hole
grey naked hole.
greynakedhole.

W końcu chciałabym zacytować przynajmniej jedną strofę z cudownej Piosenki o porcelanie Miłosza w świetnym przekładzie dokonanym przez samego autora we współpracy z Robertem Pinskym:

Różowe moje spodeczki,
Kwieciste filiżanki,
Leżące na brzegu rzeczki,
Tam kędy przeszły tanki.
Wietrzyk nad warni polata,
Puchy z pierzyny roni,
Na czarny ślad opada
Złamanej cień jabłoni.
Ziemia, gdzie spojrzysz, zasłana
Bryzgami kruchej piany.
Niczego mi, proszę pana,
Tak nie żal jak porcelany.

*

Rose-colored cup and saucer,
Flowery demitasses:
You lie beside the river
Where an armored column passes.
Winds from across the meadow
Sprinkle the banks with down;
A torn apple tree’s shadow
Falls on the muddy path;
The ground everywhere is strewn
With bits of brittle froth—
Of all things broken and lost
Porcelain troubles me most. 

„Maleńkich spodeczków trzaski” — powiada Miłosz — zapowiadają koniec „Sn[ów] majstrów drogocenn[ych] / Pióra zamarzłych łabędzi idą w ruczaje podziemne / I żadnej o nich pamięci”. Chciałabym podkreślić, że w tym miejscu Miłosz łamie swoją zasadę translatorską zachowania treści nawet kosztem formy. W wersji angielskiej fragment ten brzmi: „cups and saucers cracking, / The masters’ precious dream / Of roses, of mowers raking, / And shephards on the lawn”. Wiersz Miłosza mówiący o kruchości zarówno tego, co człowiek stworzy, jak i samego człowieka, zachowuje w angielskim przekładzie cały swój dramatyzm dlatego właśnie, że tłumaczom udało się tak poruszająco oddać oryginalny kształt strof i rymów. (Powinnam zaznaczyć, że po raz pierwszy słyszałam ten wiersz po polsku śpiewany w studenckim kabarecie w Krakowie w roku 1981 i tamta melodia — traktuję to jako hołd uznania dla talentu tłumaczy — pasuje do tekstu angielskiego równie doskonale, jak do oryginału).

Potłuczone filiżanki i zniweczona sielanka: oto pejzaż, w którym, wedle wielu teoretyków, zamieszkuje liryka w ogóle. Myślę tu o krytykach sytuujących się w każdym możliwym punkcie teoretycznego spektrum, od wrogów liryki począwszy, aż do jej zagorzałych obrońców; od Adorna, Bachtina, De Mana do Sharon Cameron czy Jerome’a McGanna. Liryka, jak chcą szczególnie krytycy ideologiczni, daje schronienie całej gromadzie nęcących mrzonek, stwarzanych przez nieoświeconych idealistów, których wizje z góry skazane są na klęskę, jako że rzeczywistość raz za razem odmawia zgody na istnienie tego czy innego Xanadu czy Bizancjum. Terry Eagelton, by przytoczyć przykład szczególnie uderzający bałamutnością, w liryce widzi głównego winowajcę rzekomego „odrzucenia [przez sztukę] życia, jakie w istocie wiedzie społeczeństwo”, a na które składa się „współudział w zorientowanych klasowo strategiach godzenia historycznych konfliktów i sprzeczności z żądaniami naturalnej i wrodzonej organizacji”.

Nie tylko ideologowie jednak dostrzegają w liryce tendencję do pewnego izolacjonizmu estetycznego. Jak powiada Sharon Cameron w swojej książce Lyric Time, poeta dąży do ucieczki od „wahań i dwuznaczności trudnej rzeczywistości”, poszukując „skrajnej tożsamości” oraz „transcendowania wizji śmiertelników”. W ten sposób staje się literackim odpowiednikiem Syzyfa, jako że dzięki nieuniknionym klęskom, które ponosi w swoich poszukiwaniach ostatecznego uwolnienia z granic śmiertelności, raz za razem trafia do jakiegoś lirycznego inferno, gdzie skazany zostaje na wszelkie możliwe formy „upadku”, „bólu”, „rozpaczy”, „wyczerpania”, „żalu” i „przerażenia”.

Cóż zatem mamy począć w tym kontekście z wierszem Białoszewskiego o zabranym piecu i z jego zaskakującym podtytułem Moja niewyczerpana oda do radości? (Ostatnie wersy wiersza po polsku brzmią następująco: „szara naga jama / szara naga jama / sza-ra-na-ga-ja-ma / szaranagajama”. Oto właśnie cudowny Białoszewskiego manewr w sztuce tracenia: jak zasugerował mi kiedyś w rozmowie pisarz Dariusz Sośnicki, w tych wersach polski poeta dotarł najbliżej, jak tylko się da, do języka japońskiego).

Mówiłam już o bogatej polskiej tradycji tworzenia ze straty. Jednak wiersz Białoszewskiego, wraz ze swym zaskakującym podtytułem, wskazuje inny kierunek, jaki obrali niektórzy spośród największych powojennych poetów polskich. Nazwę ten kierunek tradycją „radosnego niepowodzenia”, charakteryzującą się tym, że poetę prześladuje nie tyle pustka świata, ile jego nieogarniony nadmiar. „Nie możesz mieć wszystkiego. Gdzie byś to wszystko zmieścił? — pyta komik Steven Wright. Z pewnością nie w jednym wierszu, ani nawet w jednym życiu ludzkim. Oto dylemat wspólny takim poetom, jak Czesław Miłosz, Adam Zagajewski, Wisława Szymborska, których wiersze łączy nieskończona pomysłowość w podejmowaniu nieodmiennie niweczonych prób sięgnięcia w końcu do tego, co Miłosz nazywa „nieobjętą ziemią”.

„było za dużo / Lwowa, nie mieścił się w naczyniu, / rozsadzał szklanki, wylewał się ze / stawów, jezior, dymił ze wszystkich I kominów” (There was ton much of Lvov, it brimmed the container / it burst glasses, overflowed / each pond, lake, smoked through every / chimney) — pisze Zagajewski w wierszu Jechać do Lwowa, będącym równocześnie poruszającą elegią po znikłym świecie i peanem na jego nieprzemijającą obecność: „Lwów jest wszędzie” — tak kończy się ten wiersz. Żadne naczynie należące do człowieka nie może mieć nadziei, że zawrze raz i na zawsze ten świat, który nas poprzedza, przekracza i przetrwa: Lwów “rozsadzał szklanki […] dymił ze wszystkich kominów” (burst glasses […] smoked through every chimney), ostrzega Zagajewski. (Cytuję wspaniałą angielską wersję wiersza dzieła Renaty Gorczyńskiej). Forma liryczna, ze wszystkimi swoimi ograniczeniami, nie może pretendować do szerokości ujęcia, jakie dane jest powieści czy wierszowi epickiemu. Może jednak służyć jako doskonale wcielenie czy realizacja podejmowanego wciąż od nowa radosnego zmagania jednostki o to, by pogodzić się jakoś ze światem, który zawsze wykracza poza jej zasięg. W tym miejscu chciałabym wspomnieć dwa wiersze, a raczej dwa przekłady, w których starałam się dotrzymać kroku dwojgu poetom usiłującym dotrzymać kroku samemu światu. Pierwszy wiersz to Urodziny Szymborskiej:

Urodziny

Tyle naraz świata ze wszystkich stron świata:
moreny, mureny i morza i zorze,
i ogień i ogon i orzeł i orzech —
jak ja to ustawię, gdzie ja to położę?
Te chaszcze i paszcze i leszcze i deszcze
bodziszki, modliszki — gdzie ja to pomieszczę?
Motyle goryle, beryle i trele—
dziękuję, to chyba o wiele za wiele.
Do dzbanka jakiego ten łopian i łopot
i łubin i popłoch i przepych i kłopot?
Gdzie zabrać kolibra, gdzie ukryć to srebro,
co zrobić na serio z tym żubrem i zebrą?
Już taki dwutlenek, rzecz ważna i droga,
a tu ośmiornica i jeszcze stonoga!
Domyślam się ceny, choć cena z gwiazd zdarta —
dziękuję, doprawdy nie czuję się warta.
Nie szkoda to dla mnie zachodu i słońca?
Jak ma się w to bawić osoba żyjąca?
Na chwilę tu jestem i tylko na chwilę:
co dalsze przeoczę, a resztę pomylę.
Nie zdążę wszystkiego odróżnić od próżni.,
Pogubię te bratki w pośpiechu podróżnym.
Już choćby najmniejszy — szalony wydatek:
fatyga łodygi i listek i płatek
raz jeden w przestrzeni, od nigdy, na oślep,
wzgardliwie dokładny i kruchy wyniośle.

*

Birthday

So much world all at once—how it rustles and bustles!
Moraines and morays and morasses and mussels,
the flame, the flamingo, the flounder, the feather—
how to line them all up, how to put them together?
All the thickets and crickets and creepers and creeks!
The beeches and leeches alone could take weeks.
Chinchillas, gorillas, and sarsaparillas—
thanks so much, but this excess of kindness could kill us.
Where’s the jar for this burgeoning burdock, brooks’ babble,
rooks’ squabble, snakes’ squiggle, abundance, and trouble?
How to plug up the gold mines and pin down the fox,
how to cope with the lynx, bobolinks, streptococs!
Take dioxide: a lightweight, but mighty in deeds;
what about octopodes, what about centipedes?
I could look into prices, but don’t have the nerve:
 these are products I just can’t afford, don’t deserve.
Isn’t sunset a little too much for two eyes
that, who knows, may not open to see the sun rise?
I am just passing through, it’s a five-minute stop.
I won’t catch what is distant; what’s too close, I’ll mix up.
While trying to plumb what the void’s inner sense is,
I’m bound to pass by all these poppies and pansies.
What a loss when you think how much effort was spent
perfecting this petal, this pistil, this scent
for the one-time appearance that is all they’re allowed,
so aloofly precise and so fragilely proud. 

– (tłum. St. Barańczak i C. Cavanagh)

W tym wierszu Szymborska każe językowi splątywać się w szaleńczych grach słownych, rymach i rytmach, żeby dotrzymać kroku niestrudzonemu tworzeniu form ożywiającemu samą naturę. (Dostarcza także, jeśliby kto potrzebował, doskonałego argumentu przeciwko mitowi, że w przekładzie poezji dosłowność oznacza wierność. Jakże pozbawiony polotu musiałby być tłumacz, który by piątą i szóstą linijkę wiersza przełożył dosłownie, jako These thickets and muzzles and breams and rains, / geraniums and praying mantises, where will I put them?. Tekst polski w oczywisty sposób wzywa tłumaczy, żeby stanęli na głowie i wprowadzili doń echa Gilberta i Sullivana albo Ogdena Nashe’ a, proponując wersję: All the thickets and crickets and creepers and creeks! / The beeches and leeches alone could take weeks).

Drugi wiersz, który chciałabym zacytować, to piękna Mistyka dla początkujących Adama Zagajewskiego:

Mistyka dla początkujących

Dzień był łagodny, światło przyjazne.
Ten Niemiec na tarasie kawiarni
trzymał na kolanach niedużą książkę.
Udało mi się zobaczyć jej tytuł:
Mistyka dla początkujących.
Od razu zrozumiałem, że jaskółki,
które przenikliwie gwiżdżąc,
patrolowały ulice Montepulciano,
i ściszone rozmowy onieśmielonych wędrowców
z Europy Wschodniej zwanej Środkową,
i białe czaple, stojące — wczoraj, przedwczoraj?
w polach ryżowych jak zakonnice,
i zmierzch, powolny i systematyczny,
zacierający kontury średniowiecznych domów,
i drzewa oliwne na niewielkich wzgórzach,
poddane wiatrom i pożarom,
i głowa Nieznanej księżniczki,
którą widziałem i podziwiałem w Luwrze,
i witraże w kościołach jak skrzydła motyli
pomazane pyłkiem kwiatów,
mały słowik, który ćwiczył recytację
tuż przy autostradzie,
i podróże, wszystkie podróże,
to była tylko mistyka dla początkujących.
wstępny kurs, prolegomena
do egzaminu, który odłożony został
na później.

*

Mysticism for Beginners.

The day was mild, the light was generous.
The German on the cafe terrace
held a small book on his lap.
I caught sight of the title:
Mysticism for Beginners.
Suddenly I understood that the swallows
patrolling the streets of Montepulciano
with their shrill whistles,
and the hushed talk of timid travelers
from Eastern, so-called Central Europe,
and the white herons standing—yesterday? the day before?—
like nuns in fields of rice,
and the dusk, slow and systematic,
erasing the outlines of medieval houses,
and olive trees on little hills,
abandoned to the wind and heat,
and the head of the Unknown Princess
that I saw and admired in the Louvre,
and stained-glass windows like butterfly wings
sprinkled with pollen,
and the little nightingale practicing
its speech beside the highway,
and any journey, any kind of trip,
are only mysticism for beginners,
the elementary course, prelude
to a test that’s been
postponed. 

– Tłum. Clare Cavanagh

Oto kolejny popis możliwości tworzenia lirycznej radości poprzez pozorną klęskę, jako że Zagajewski, w charakterystycznej syntaktycznej tour de force, aż do bezdechu rozciąga jedno zdanie na przestrzeni dwudziestu kilku wersów, tylko po to, by zakończyć zaskakująco kontrastowym odroczonym egzaminem, który pojawia się w miejsce epifanii — „nagle zrozumiałem” — suddenly I understood — na którą czekaliśmy. Kończąc własne wystąpienie, chciałabym jednak przytoczyć zupełnie niepoetycką analogię do zasadniczego pokrewieństwa, jakie dostrzegam między radosną porażką poety a tą, jakiej doświadcza tłumacz. Kilka lat temu, kiedy mój syn zaczynał chodzić, wymyślił sobie zabawę, która wszystkich śmiertelnie przerażała. Brał koc, zakładał go sobie na głowę, biegł korytarzem, walił z całej siły głową w ścianę, padał na podłogę i pękał ze śmiechu. „O Boże — myśleliśmy. — Będzie futbolistą”. Rozmawiałam kiedyś ze znajomą, która jest psychologiem dziecięcym i opowiedziałam jej o zabawie Marty’ego. „On przeprowadza eksperyment filozoficzny”, wyjaśniła. „Po prostu chce sprawdzić, czy świat nadal jest nawet wtedy, gdy go nie widzi i, waląc głową w ścianę, śmieje się, bo ona jednak wciąż istnieje”.

Forma, treść i radosne niepowodzenie: oto zasadnicze elementy nie tylko zabawy mojego syna, ale również, jak twierdzę, poezji lirycznej oraz jej przekładu. Oczywiście, że przekładanie poezji jest niemożliwe: tak jak niemożliwe jest wszystko, co najlepsze. Ale siła, która nas popycha do podejmowania prób, nie jest bardzo odmienna od tej, która każe poecie raz za razem podejmować próby zawarcia świata w kilku linijkach wiersza. Mamy oto przed sobą coś cudownego i chcemy do tego dotrzeć. Próbujemy czytać w kółko, nauczyć się na pamięć, przepisać linijka po linijce. Ale nic nie wystarcza, to wciąż istnieje. Jeśli więc nie ma jeszcze angielskiej wersji, zwracamy się ku przekładowi: odtwarzamy to we własnym języku, we własnych słowach, ulegając próżnej nadziei, że uchwycimy to na zawsze, że ostatecznie to zawłaszczymy. I czasem czujemy nawet, przynajmniej przez chwilę, dzień czy dwa, czy nawet przez kilka tygodni, że się nam udało, że wiersz jest nasz, że go mamy. Ale potem, w jakimś momencie, wracamy do oryginału i ze śmiechem walimy głową w ścianę: to wciąż istnieje.

– – –

The myth of Babel tells of the loss of the earth’s one language and one speech, and the confusion of languages. Suddenly every object and every idea assumed a plurality of names, and the oversized tower, symbol of human imagination and hubris, was abandoned within the shadow foreboding its destruction. With an unprecedented series of correlated texts, Specimen explores these magnificent ruins, hearing echoes of the multiplicity of languages and the birth of translation. This collection includes texts about Babel, translation or language, and special translations. In September 2021, 20 years after 9/11, the Babel festival will focus on the multiplication of languages and the present diaspora from the regions of ancient Babylon – the scattering of the children of men over the face of all the earth. >> www.babelfestival.com

© Zeszyty Literackie 2003


Other
Languages
English
Polish

Your
Tools
Close Language
Close Language
Add Bookmark